Tuesday, September 26, 2017

2012 yearbooks should be arriving soon

There is no getting around it, the 2012 yearbooks are really late.

The good news is, those tardy books are finally going to arrive around Spring Break.

According to Mr. Weed, there will be a special handout for Class of 2012 graduates at some point, and he will use Facebook, Twitter, email and the ThunderHawk website to spread the details once he knows.

For graduates that can’t make the handout date, they may pick up the books in the high school office or send a family member to do so.  Graduates who still haven’t purchased a book but would like to do so should contact Mr. Weed at kweed@hamiltonschools.us

Current students who ordered yearbooks will be able to pick them up at both lunches.

So why were they so late?

While there were problems that were not anticipated along the way, class adviser Mr. Kevin Weed said he shoulders the blame for the book’s tardiness.

In a letter he has sent out to inquiring graduates and parents, Mr. Weed explained:

“I do sincerely apologize for the delay in the 2012 yearbooks,” Mr. Weed wrote.  “I don’t want to make excuses, and as the leader of the class in which the book is produced, it is ultimately my fault for its late delivery.”

In Mr. Weed’s letter, he went on to explain not only the difficulty in getting the book done last year, but the changes in the class curriculum.

“It’s not as if I had a class full of slackers, we just had an enormous amount of work to do with the new curriculum set-up.”

Many current students and recent graduates just expect the yearbook to come out before the seniors graduate in the spring. Then, they get mad when it doesn’t come “on time”.  What many people don’t know is Hamilton’s yearbook has traditionally come in the fall of the following school year.  It usually arrived between September and October, but once came in early December.

Still, the tardiness of the 2012 yearbook is unprecedented.

Mr. Weed pointed out, that ever since the newspaper and the yearbook were combined into one class, students who decided to be apart of it usually have two totally different jobs.

“We produce our online newspaper Tbe ThunderHawk, the print edition of the newspaper, the yearbook and video productions as well,” he said.

This can be a bit hectic at times when the students have to make certain deadlines in order things to be on time.

“We’re trying to work the kinks out so we can make it on time this year,” he said.

WHAT WILL THE BOOK LOOK LIKE

Last year, the staff wanted to do the best job they could to capture that memorable year. This took a huge time commitment from everyone on staff. However, the staff all agreed to this extra time would produce one of the best yearbooks that captures the entire year and not just part of it.

“I think the hardest part about working on the yearbook was making sure all of the final pages followed the agreed format for the book,” said Monica Vandenbil, 2011-’12 Editor in chief. “When there are multiple people each working on individual pages of the same book, there are going to be mismatched fonts and color swatches. It takes a lot of time to go through and fix these mistakes, which makes it harder to meet deadlines as well.”

– ThunderHawk staff contributed to this report 

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